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Be - Beryllium

Beryllium

 Beryllium 
Be
Atomic Number: 4
Atomic Weight: 9.01218
Element Type: Alkali Earth Metal
Crystal Structure: Hexagonal
Melting Point: 1287.0°C = 2348.6°F = 1560.15 K
Boiling Point: 2471.0°C = 4479.8°F = 2744.15 K
Critical Temp: °C = °F = K
Atomic Radius: 1.4 Å (Å = Angstrom = 10-10 m)
Covalent Radius: 0.9 Å
Electronegativity: 1.57

History

(Gr. beryllos, beryl; also called Glucinium or Glucinum, Gr. glykys, sweet) Discoveredas the oxide by Vauquelin in beryl and in emeralds in 1798. The metal was isolated in 1828by Wohler and by Bussy independently by the action of potassium on beryllium chloride.


Sources

Beryllium is found in some 30 mineral species, the most important of which arebertrandite, beryl, chrysoberyl, and phenacite. Aquamarine and emerald are precious formsof beryl. Beryl and bertrandite are the most important commercial sources of the elementand its compounds. Most of the metal is now prepared by reducing beryllium fluoride withmagnesium metal. Beryllium metal did not become readily available to industry until 1957.







Science Quote

'For the sake of persons of ... different types, scientific truth should be presented in different forms, and should be regarded as equally scientific, whether it appears in the robust form and the vivid coloring of a physical illustration, or in the tenuity and paleness of a symbolic expression.'

James Clerk Maxwell
(1831-1879)





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